Coagulation Disorders

Coagulation Disorders: Thrombophilia or Hypercoagulability

Thrombophilia or hypercoagulability is a propensity to developed thrombosis–blood clots in the blood circulation.  In most cases is due to an abnormality in the coagulation system. Thrombus is

One of the most common stories of thrombophilia, which I encounter in my practice is blood clots as a consequence of prolonged traveling. In a typical history, patient has had a prolonged traveling and after 3-5 days  noted  leg edema and discomfort for about a week which is followed by sudden onset of shortness of breath, difficulty breathing,  and sharp right-sided chest pain-all these signs of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities (clots in the veins) and pulmonary embolism (clots in the lungs).

 

What are the risk factors associated with thrombosis?

Thrombophilia or hypercoagulability is a propensity to developed thrombosis–blood clots in the blood circulation.  In most cases is due to an abnormality in the system to coagulation.

 

An intravascular mass blood cells and a specialized plasma protein called fibrin

Numerous factors are associated with thrombosis such as:

  • Inflammation
  • Cancer
  • Estrogens
  • Cancer
  • Trauma,
  • Surgery,
  • Acquired thrombophilia,
  • hereditary thrombophilia
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Immobility
  • Medications such as heparin
  • Advancing age
  • Prior thrombosis
  • Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome
  • Prolonged air travel
  • Inherited risk factors include:
  • Antithrombin deficiency
  • Protein C deficiency
  • Protein insufficiency
  • Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Prothrombin gene mutation
  • Fibrin disorders
  • High levels of factor VIII
  • Acquired protein C resistance in the absence of factor V Leiden
  • High levels of factor IX and XI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The information in this document does not replace a medical consultation. It is for personal guidance use only. We recommend that patients ask their doctors about what tests or types of treatments are needed for their type and stage of the disease.

Sources:

  • American Cancer Society
  • The National Cancer Institute
  • National Comprehensive Cancer Network
  • American Academy of Gastroenterology
  • National Institute of Health
  • MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • American Academy of Hematology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2018 - Hematology Oncology Care. Digital Marketing by MD Digitas